Ron Dennis frustrated by lack of engine parity with Mercedes works team

Originally posted on Adam Cooper's F1 Blog:

Ron Dennis made it clear today that he believes that McLaren has been at a disadvantage relative to the Mercedes works team this year.

Dennis said that McLaren has not had the chance to use the new power unit to its full advantage because of a lack of access to data, and even hinted that the team had not had “the best engines.”

His words made it pretty clear that the team’s 20-season partnership with Mercedes is under strain as it edges towards its conclusion.

Ron was commenting on why McLaren has put itself in the position of being Honda’s works team in 2015.

“One thing that jumps you if you look at all of the qualifications of all of this year is the time difference between the Mercedes-Benz works team and the other teams,” said Dennis. “By and large it’s always in excess of a second, putting aside the…

View original 299 more words

#F1 Radio Special – #SingaporeGP

Joe Papp:

devastating.

Originally posted on thejudge13:

Brought to you by TheJudge13 contributor Mattpt55 - a special look at the mind behind the ban on radio traffic

For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darknes of this world, against spirituall wickednes in high places - 1611 King James Bible

There is some perverse human characteristic that likes to make easy things difficult.” – Warren Buffet

Detail, Press Briefing Charlie Whiting Saturday 20.09.14

Charlie Sez:

11CW1

If it’s quite straightforward, then why the controversy. Oh wait, it’s OK to tell them to change settings, but then it’s not OK if it’s just one part of the track. How could that possibly cause confusion

Charlie Sez:

11CW2

You mean after the Team Principals finished shredding what was left of your intellectual dignity. The teams have been evolving the engineer-driver symbiosis for almost a decade and suddenly it’s too much…

View original 1,005 more words

#F1 Features: Enzo Ferrari – How do you measure a person’s life – Part II

Originally posted on thejudge13:

Brought to you by TheJudge13 chronicler: Carlo Carluccio

Editors Note: This feature article is the second part of a three-part feature, culminating on the 14th August, looking at and celebrating the life of a motorsport great, Enzo Ferrari.

Tazio Nuvolari

Tazio NuvolariNuvolari was a massive part of the Ferrari story, winning impossible races in Alfas, dedicated to the same Italy that Enzo was so patriotic about and a driver who left Ferrari confounded with his skill.

“At the first bend,” Ferrari writes, “I had the clear sensation that Tazio had taken it badly and that we would end up in the ditch; I felt myself stiffen as I waited for the crunch. Instead, we found ourselves on the next straight with the car in a perfect position. I looked at him,” Ferrari goes on.

“His rugged face was calm, just as it always was, and certainly not the face of someone who…

View original 1,406 more words

Good news?

Joe Papp:

Dr. Hartstein’s voice on this matter has been a welcome addition to the unfortunate speculation that will continue even in the absence of stolen medical files…

Originally posted on A Former F1 Doc Writes:

As my mom always said, “You make your bed, you gotta sleep in it”. So even though I was sure I’d written my last post having anything to do directly with the Michael Schumacher tragedy, I just want to answer the hundreds of questions I’ve already gotten as to the import of todays statement.

1) It is obviously good news that Michael has left the hospital. Because of the length of time since Michael’s injury, and of the specific role of an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in supporting and monitoring the function of the body’s major systems, it’s almost certain that Michael has not simply been discharged from the ICU to a rehab, without having “transitioned” by a stay on the regular wards. I have never seen a head injury patient with a 5 month ICU admission be transferred directly to a rehab facility . . . but anything’s possible. 

Remember…

View original 325 more words

Good news?

Good news?.

Marco Mattiacci on leading Ferrari: “I come with a lot of humility…”

Joe Papp:

At least Mattiacci is honest about his role in all this…

“… For me it’s to get the highest motivation possible, and to define a certain project management. It’s not me that’s going to give one extra second to the car, it’s the engineers who work for us.”

Originally posted on Adam Cooper's F1 Blog:

New Ferrari boss Marco Mattiacci says the opportunity to take over as head of the F1 team came out of the blue in a phone call from Luca di Montezemolo last week – some 72 hours before the news of his appointment was officially confirmed.

The erstwhile Ferrari North America boss was in New York when his boss rang.

“I received a call at 5.58am on Friday morning,” he said. “It was the chairman Montezemolo on the phone, and he told me this is my idea. And I thought that April Fools was already far away, it was 15 days later! Then after the second or third minute of discussion I understood that it was serious. I understood because there was already a ticket ready to go from New York, to Milan, after three hours. I arrived Saturday morning at Maranello, at the Fiorano track.”

Mattiacci said he spent some…

View original 504 more words

An extraordinary FIA public offensive

An extraordinary FIA public offensive.

Great job reporting and commenting on this, Your Honour. I stopped at another site where alleged F1 Fanatics gather, and saw no mention of this as a lead item, though it may’ve been embedded in one update or another.

This is great that you’re leading with it right now.

And I agree wholeheartedly with the sentiments you express vis-a-vis Red Bull Racing’s willingness to bring the sport of F1 into disrepute by lodging a frivolous appeal at the same time they seek to undermine the very foundation of fair and and level playing field (track surface? lol): the ability of FIA to apply and enforce a uniform set of rules applicable to all 11 teams.

When RBR lose their appeal, they should face additional sanction for bringing the sport of F1 into disrepute.

I don’t think any F1 fan would object to a team appealing a truly unjust, unfair, or incorrect ruling, but this is a transparent, near-naked attempt by RBR to undermine a fundamental regulatory regime simply because their Renault engine is, for once, limiting their car’s performance.

For shame, RBR – for shame!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.